Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Free Essays on Title IX

Title IX Since the conception of America, 11,698 people have served in congress. Of those 11,698, 216 have been women. Currently, women are 51% of the population, 14.3% of the Cabinet, 14% of the U.S. Senate, 14.26% of the U.S. House, 22% of the U.S. Supreme Court, 20.6% of Federal Judges, 18% of state Governors, 20.8% of State Senators, 23% of state Representatives, 9% of state Judges, and 20.8% of big city mayors (Brown Par. 1). Women are increasingly becoming a bigger part of the U.S. government, but not quite equivalent to their population dominance. Despite these relatively small numbers, women have made an impact on politics. Specifically with their contributions to Title IX which went into effect July 1, 1972 (U.S. Department of Education 5). Title IX was a landmark legislation that had a large impact on the women’s movement. Title IX has benefited women in many ways, by requiring equal opportunity for both males and females. Title IX has changed assumptions about female s, lowered the drop-out rate among females, increasing opportunities in both math and science, increasing the completion of post-secondary programs among females, opened up professions and employment opportunities for females, and increased female participation in sports. As the women's civil rights movement gained momentum in the late 1960s and early 1970s, feminists began to focus attention on inequities that prevented the progress of women in education. These issues in education were first brought into the public eye when Representative Edith Green from Oregon, introduced a higher education bill with provisions regarding sex equality. In 1971 more legislation was introduced to ban sex discrimination in education. All the bills that were introduced were compiled into one to form Title IX. Title IX went into effect July 1, 1972. (U.S. Department of Education 5) Title IX stated that "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, b... Free Essays on Title IX Free Essays on Title IX Title IX Since the conception of America, 11,698 people have served in congress. Of those 11,698, 216 have been women. Currently, women are 51% of the population, 14.3% of the Cabinet, 14% of the U.S. Senate, 14.26% of the U.S. House, 22% of the U.S. Supreme Court, 20.6% of Federal Judges, 18% of state Governors, 20.8% of State Senators, 23% of state Representatives, 9% of state Judges, and 20.8% of big city mayors (Brown Par. 1). Women are increasingly becoming a bigger part of the U.S. government, but not quite equivalent to their population dominance. Despite these relatively small numbers, women have made an impact on politics. Specifically with their contributions to Title IX which went into effect July 1, 1972 (U.S. Department of Education 5). Title IX was a landmark legislation that had a large impact on the women’s movement. Title IX has benefited women in many ways, by requiring equal opportunity for both males and females. Title IX has changed assumptions about female s, lowered the drop-out rate among females, increasing opportunities in both math and science, increasing the completion of post-secondary programs among females, opened up professions and employment opportunities for females, and increased female participation in sports. As the women's civil rights movement gained momentum in the late 1960s and early 1970s, feminists began to focus attention on inequities that prevented the progress of women in education. These issues in education were first brought into the public eye when Representative Edith Green from Oregon, introduced a higher education bill with provisions regarding sex equality. In 1971 more legislation was introduced to ban sex discrimination in education. All the bills that were introduced were compiled into one to form Title IX. Title IX went into effect July 1, 1972. (U.S. Department of Education 5) Title IX stated that "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, b...